Discussion:
HTML code for 'send an e-mail to'
(too old to reply)
Roger Darlington
2019-03-15 07:45:53 UTC
Permalink
In my Wildflowerfinder website I have put the following line for
readers who wish to contact me:

<a href="mailto:***@freeuk.com?subject=Submitted%3A%20Unknown%20W
ildflower%20Photograph&body=Where%20Found:%0A%0DDate%20Found:%20%0A">

It works perfectly on RO4. and other RO OS's.

But sometimes doesn't using on Firefox on a Windows7 computer (but
only sort of..) On Windows 7 Firefox it gives a choice of 4 e-mail
programs:

Windows Live Mail
Yahoo Mail
Yahoo Mail
Google Mail

I don't use any of those myself, but I clicked on Windows Live Mail
and that did automatically insert ***@freeuk.com into the Send-To
box. HURRAY!

I then selected Google Mail instead and that brought up Gmail but
didn't fill the Send-To box in with anything! [I'm not actually
registered with Google or Gmail, so maybe that makes a difference, but
I doubt it. A reader of my website allerted mw=e to the fact that it
didn't work with Gmail on his computer, and he is presumably
registered with both Google and Gmail]

Have Google written their Gmail thing correctly?

Or maybe I haven't written my code correctly?

How do I make it work for whatever e-mail client folk are using?

Does the code need to be 3 pages long to work?
--
Cheers
Roger
Never use just one cooking pot when you can make do with all of them
Alan Wrigley
2019-03-15 09:12:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Darlington
Have Google written their Gmail thing correctly?
Or maybe I haven't written my code correctly?
How do I make it work for whatever e-mail client folk are using?
Does the code need to be 3 pages long to work?
I always put a contact form on my websites. It avoids putting email
addresses directly into a web page and also does away with the need to cater
for different email clients.

Alan
--
RISC OS - you know it makes cents
Alan Adams
2019-03-15 09:54:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Wrigley
Post by Roger Darlington
Have Google written their Gmail thing correctly?
Or maybe I haven't written my code correctly?
How do I make it work for whatever e-mail client folk are using?
Does the code need to be 3 pages long to work?
I always put a contact form on my websites. It avoids putting email
addresses directly into a web page and also does away with the need to cater
for different email clients.
Alan
I'd agree with that.

The problem with mailto: is that different browsers respect different
parts of the message - some only fill in the TO address - and then they
need to be able to launch the email client on the computer, which doesn't
always work.

A contact form does require server-side processing, often using php.
--
Alan Adams, from Northamptonshire
***@adamshome.org.uk
http://www.nckc.org.uk/
Alan Wrigley
2019-03-15 11:08:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Adams
A contact form does require server-side processing, often using php.
And adequate traps to ensure it can't be misused by spammers. It can be
quite surprising how ingenious they can be in exploiting weaknesses in the
script that processes the form.

Alan
--
RISC OS - you know it makes cents
Theo
2019-03-15 11:29:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Adams
The problem with mailto: is that different browsers respect different
parts of the message - some only fill in the TO address - and then they
need to be able to launch the email client on the computer, which doesn't
always work.
As a general rule mailto: doesn't work when your mail client runs on a
different computer from your browser. Either physically different (browse
on your phone, email on your laptop), or you use some cloud webmail and your
browser doesn't know about it. There are some cases where that can be made to
work (eg Chrome and Gmail) but in the general case you might be using, say,
your employer's webmail and to your browser it's just another website.
Post by Alan Adams
A contact form does require server-side processing, often using php.
It's also a spam risk, unless you lock it down (eg to only send emails to
yourself, not having the destination email address in the HTML).

Theo
Alexander Ausserstorfer
2019-04-06 17:18:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Adams
A contact form does require server-side processing, often using php.
A new law in the EU requires that the contact form have to use TLS / SSL
- so be happy to go out from the EU finally!

Is it possible to use Javascript for a contact form to avoid server-side
processing?

A.
--
http://home.chiemgau-net.de/ausserstorfer/
Und aus!
Steve Fryatt
2019-04-07 09:16:43 UTC
Permalink
On 6 Apr, Alexander Ausserstorfer wrote in message
Post by Alan Adams
A contact form does require server-side processing, often using php.
A new law in the EU requires that the contact form have to use TLS / SSL -
so be happy to go out from the EU finally!
Have you a cite for that claim?
--
Steve Fryatt - Leeds, England

http://www.stevefryatt.org.uk/
Alexander Ausserstorfer
2019-04-07 18:12:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Fryatt
On 6 Apr, Alexander Ausserstorfer wrote in message
Post by Alan Adams
A contact form does require server-side processing, often using php.
A new law in the EU requires that the contact form have to use TLS / SSL -
so be happy to go out from the EU finally!
Have you a cite for that claim?
Claim? Every provider here is telling you that:

https://gdpr-info.eu/art-32-gdpr/

A.
--
http://home.chiemgau-net.de/ausserstorfer/
Und aus!
Steve Fryatt
2019-04-09 20:33:01 UTC
Permalink
On 7 Apr, Alexander Ausserstorfer wrote in message
Post by Alexander Ausserstorfer
Post by Steve Fryatt
On 6 Apr, Alexander Ausserstorfer wrote in message
Post by Alexander Ausserstorfer
A new law in the EU requires that the contact form have to use TLS /
SSL - so be happy to go out from the EU finally!
Have you a cite for that claim?
https://gdpr-info.eu/art-32-gdpr/
Oh, the GDPR. So only contact forms containing personal data, then? Not
hugely unreasonable...

The browser manufacturers are ahead of the EU, since they more or less
mandate HTTPS for /all/ sites containing forms -- with scary warnings for
users on sites which dare not to conform.
--
Steve Fryatt - Leeds, England

http://www.stevefryatt.org.uk/
Jim Nagel
2019-03-15 23:41:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Darlington
In my Wildflowerfinder website I have put the following line for
ildflower%20Photograph&body=Where%20Found:%0A%0DDate%20Found:%20%0A">
...
Post by Roger Darlington
How do I make it work for whatever e-mail client folk are using?
Does the code need to be 3 pages long to work?
No need for "mailto" code or forms. Since you have your own domain
(wildflowerfinder.org.uk), why not just set up an address -- e.g.
***@wildflowerfinder.org.uk -- that you simply publish openly on
your site. The spambots will inevitably find it, but probably not for
several months, whereupon you can just scrap that address and set up a
different one.

In the webhost's control panel, make this inital-contact address redirect
to your "real" address. Never publish the real address; you don't want
spambots to see it.

In your email client (Messenger Pro), you could filter such
initial-contact messages to a designated folder.

When you receive a genuine message via the initial-contact address, you
can reply to that person from your real address.
--
Jim Nagel www.archivemag.co.uk
Post by Roger Darlington
"From" address is genuine but will change. Website has current one.
Roger Darlington
2019-03-16 07:41:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Nagel
Post by Roger Darlington
In my Wildflowerfinder website I have put the following line for
ildflower%20Photograph&body=Where%20Found:%0A%0DDate%20Found:%20%0A">
...
Post by Roger Darlington
How do I make it work for whatever e-mail client folk are using?
Does the code need to be 3 pages long to work?
No need for "mailto" code or forms. Since you have your own domain
(wildflowerfinder.org.uk), why not just set up an address -- e.g.
your site. The spambots will inevitably find it, but probably not for
several months, whereupon you can just scrap that address and set up a
different one.
In the webhost's control panel, make this inital-contact address redirect
to your "real" address. Never publish the real address; you don't want
spambots to see it.
In your email client (Messenger Pro), you could filter such
initial-contact messages to a designated folder.
When you receive a genuine message via the initial-contact address, you
can reply to that person from your real address.
OK, thanks Nigel.

That looks a simpler strategy.
--
Cheers
Roger
Where there's a Will, there's a Hey.
Alan Wrigley
2019-03-16 09:01:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Darlington
Post by Jim Nagel
No need for "mailto" code or forms. Since you have your own domain
(wildflowerfinder.org.uk), why not just set up an address -- e.g.
your site. The spambots will inevitably find it, but probably not for
several months, whereupon you can just scrap that address and set up a
different one.
That looks a simpler strategy.
It does mean, though, that people can't just click on a button but will
haver to copy/paste or type the address into their mail client.

Personally I prefer solutions that make it simpler for the user, not for the
coder.

Alan
--
RISC OS - you know it makes cents
Jim Nagel
2019-03-16 13:11:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Wrigley
Post by Roger Darlington
That looks a simpler strategy.
It does mean, though, that people can't just click on a button but will
have to copy/paste or type the address into their mail client.
Hmm. Contrary to what I wrote about "no mailto", I see this is what I
have on the Archive site (site actually designed by the late David
Worden):

<A HREF = "mailto:***@archivemag.co.uk">
***@archivemag.co.uk </A>

As far as I am aware, readers can just click the link to cause a new
message to open in their email client. (Have tested only with Windows
FIrefox and Android tablet.) It doesn't supply subject line etc, but not
really needed, given that the ersatz contact address carries the clue.

Similar on other sites I do, e.g. http://glastonburyconservation.org.uk

In my experience, the openly published address is OK for a year to 18
months before enough spam arrives to bother setting up a new contact
address. (Applies also for the throwaway "From" address I use for
newsgroups, such as c.s.a.)

Dunno which webhost Roger uses for his wildflower site. Host might have a
readymade contact form of the sort Alan suggests.
--
Jim Nagel www.archivemag.co.uk
Post by Alan Wrigley
Post by Roger Darlington
"From" address is genuine but will change. Website has current one.
Richard Darby
2019-03-16 16:54:44 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@6.abbeypress.net>,
Jim Nagel <***@abbeypress.co.uk> wrote:
[snip]
Post by Jim Nagel
Dunno which webhost Roger uses for his wildflower site. Host might have
a readymade contact form of the sort Alan suggests.
I use FormMail which is a php script, very comprehensive and
customizeable. Obtainable from here:
https://www.tectite.com/


Richard Darby
--
Richard Darby.
website: http://www.rjdarby.co.uk
Do not reply to this address all mail is deleted.
Reply to: <my first name> at <my domain>
John Williams (News)
2019-03-16 09:18:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Darlington
OK, thanks Nigel.
I think we should all call Jim Nigel from now on!

John
--
John Williams, now back in the UK - no attachments to these addresses!
Non-RISC OS posters change user to johnrwilliams or put 'risc' in subject!
Who is John Williams? http://petit.four.free.fr/picindex/author/
Alan Wrigley
2019-03-16 10:30:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Williams (News)
Post by Roger Darlington
OK, thanks Nigel.
I think we should all call Jim Nigel from now on!
Would that be Jam Nigel?

Alan
--
RISC OS - you know it makes cents
Jim Nagel
2019-03-16 12:42:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Wrigley
Post by John Williams (News)
I think we should all call Jim Nigel from now on!
Would that be Jam Nigel?
I like it. I have occasionally been called jammy dodger; having been
brought up Canadian, though, I've never been quite sure of the allusion.
--
Jim Nagel www.archivemag.co.uk
Post by Alan Wrigley
Post by John Williams (News)
"From" address is genuine but will change. Website has current one.
Steve Fryatt
2019-03-16 10:19:57 UTC
Permalink
On 15 Mar, Jim Nagel wrote in message
Post by Jim Nagel
In my Wildflowerfinder website I have put the following line for readers
who wish to contact me: <a
ildflower%20Photograph&body=Where%20Found:%0A%0DDate%20Found:%20%0A">
...
How do I make it work for whatever e-mail client folk are using? Does
the code need to be 3 pages long to work?
No need for "mailto" code or forms. Since you have your own domain
(wildflowerfinder.org.uk), why not just set up an address -- e.g.
your site. The spambots will inevitably find it, but probably not for
several months, whereupon you can just scrap that address and set up a
different one.
That doesn't actually address Roger's question of how to have a link set up
the email details, however.

The short answer is that mailto: is supported differently by different email
clients, and that is always going to be the case. If you're collecting
specific data fields, a web form is very likely to be the way to go -- not
least because you can then validate what has been entered before accepting
it from the user.
Post by Jim Nagel
In the webhost's control panel, make this inital-contact address redirect
to your "real" address. Never publish the real address; you don't want
spambots to see it.
The words "just set up an address" also hides a potential world of pain if
Roger doesn't currently have an email account on the wildflower domain.
Depending on what inbound mail checks are applied by FreeUK, mail forwarders
can be unreliable (in the sense of legitimate messages being detected as
spam and deleted, because they tickle DMARC in the wrong way).
--
Steve Fryatt - Leeds, England

http://www.stevefryatt.org.uk/
David Higton
2019-03-16 18:51:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Darlington
In my Wildflowerfinder website I have put the following line for
ildflower%20Photograph&body=Where%20Found:%0A%0DDate%20Found:%20%0A">
You have two line feeds and a carriage return in there. I don't
think you should.

Dave
Alex Macfarlane Smith
2019-03-17 21:43:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Higton
Post by Roger Darlington
In my Wildflowerfinder website I have put the following line for
ildflower%20Photograph&body=Where%20Found:%0A%0DDate%20Found:%20%0A">
You have two line feeds and a carriage return in there. I don't
think you should.
Dave
That's fine (or at least works in some mail clients) -
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/11507387/mailto-body-formatting

Although %0D%0A is possibly more conventional.
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